11.06.2008

what sound does a pheasant make?

Photobucket I don't have a clue. I am not joking. Of all the animals we imitate as children, I have never heard the sound of a pheasant. And I've seen many, and they are gorgeous birds. The sound doesn't matter so much, but I'm about to say that it is yummy. Quite a bit like chicken. Jeff and I are lucky to have found a local organic source of pheasant, from a nearby farm. But if you can't get your hands on one, try chicken with this recipe. It's a combination of porcini mushrooms, and rosemary that is cooked with the bird until the meat effortlessly falls off the bone. There's not a lot more I have to say about this dish, but it was heavenly in a warmed bowl, on sofa, near the fireplace. We are entering winter territory here, and I have to get into this kind of hearty cooking. Honestly, it's something I can't do without. Photobucket Pheasant & Mushroom Pasta Adapted from Biba's Italy 1 2-3 lb pheasant, halved, washed, and dried with paper towels 2 cups dried porcini mushrooms, soaked in 2 cups lukewarm water for 20 minutes 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 cup all-purpose flour 3 tablespoons butter 1 cup diced onion 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 sprigs fresh rosemary 2 tablespoons fresh flat-leaf parsley 1 cup dry marsala 1 (28-ounce) can Italian plum or cherry tomatoes 1. In a deep-sided sauté pan, heat the olive oil on medium-high heat. Lightly dredge the pheasant halves in flour, and sauté on all sides, until golden brown. Remove from heat, and place the pheasant halves on a plate with paper towels. Empty excess oil from the pan. 2. Add the butter to the pan, on medium-high, until it begins to foam. Add the onions and seasons with salt. Sauté for 2-3 minutes, then add garlic and rosemary. 3. Reserving the mushroom soaking liquid, strain the mushrooms. Add the mushrooms to the onion and garlic mixture, and sauté for 2-3 minutes. Add the marsala, and continue to stir until it has mostly evaporated. Add the tomatoes, running a knife through several, to help them break down in the cooking process. Slowly add the reserved liquid from the mushrooms, being careful to keep the sediment in the bottom. 4. When the sauce begins to bubble, nestle the pheasant halves inside. (now they are happy!) Turn the heat down to low, or medium low. Leave it. Let it simmer for at least 1 hour, and then stir in the chopped parsley. Longer cooking is better - preferably 2 hours, or until the meat easily comes away from the bone with a fork. Add water if necessary. Season according to taste, and remove the sprigs of rosemary. 5. Prepare your favourite pappardelle, or linguine according to package instructions. 6. In a separate bowl, add separated bite-size pieces of pheasant and sauce according to the amount of pasta you have prepared. Gently combine with tongs, and plate. Or bowl, if you prefer. 7. Serve immediately, with a hearty red wine, and an acidic green salad.

9 comments:

Mike said...

Looks very tasty! Pheasant was one of my favorites growing up. I haven't had it in years, though - you are lucky to have it available.

Freya said...

For the record, pheasants are quite noisy, particularly at dawn and at dusk! We have hundreds of them around here at the moment, looking resplendent in their Autumn colours!

Jan said...

I've never tried pheasant before - the pasta dish you made looks lovely and very tasty!!

gail said...

freya - I figured as much. It is somewhat odd that we are taught the sound of nearly every other animal - ie. immediately I think cow = moo. But nothing comes to mind immediately with pheasant's except for their beautiful feathers. (that and they are very mean apparently)

Reeni said...

I've never tried pheasant either but I bet this would be just as delicious with chicken. I've been craving pappardelle, this would do just fine.

Vanessa said...

oh, yummy!! I don't do pheasant in I don't really know how to clean it and cook it. But I know how to eat it, and this just made me hungry!! Great recipe Gail!

Veronica said...

I will have to try pheasant again one day. I had pheasant once, but it was dry and the sauce was all wrong for it.

your pictures are always so beautiful :)

michelle of bleeding espresso said...

They're LOUD and screechy, especially great watch birds..and quite tasty. This looks great :)

LutheranChik said...

In answer to your question: A ringneck pheasant cock makes a sound like the horn of an old Model T -- "Ah--OO-ga!"

The recipe looks wonderful. I just wish I could find a local source for dressed, freezer-ready pheasant. Ironically, I live in rural Michigan -- you'd think there'd be a game farm within reasonable driving distance where I could score some dressed pheasant. Oh, well.

Related Posts with Thumbnails